Spurs Are On Their Way To Wembley Lyrics?

04.09.2022

Come on you Spurs, Come on you Spurs, Come on you Spurs are on their way to Wembley, Tottenham’s going to do it again, … Come on you Spurs, Come on you Spurs, Come on you Spurs are on their way to Wembley, Tottenham’s going to do it again, They can’t stop ’em, The boys from Tottenham, The boys from White Hart Lane, Spurs are on their way to Wembley, The Kings are claiming their crown, Everybody will be singing, When the Spurs go marching home We are the boys from Keithy’s army And we’re marching off to war, We’re sending our soldiers to Wembley Under General Burkinshaw, We know the enemy will fear us, In the battle coming up, They won’t even get near us We’re gonna capture the cup Come on you Spurs are on their way to Wembley, Tottenham’s going to do it again, They can’t stop ’em, The boys from Tottenham, The boys from White Hart Lane, Spurs are on their way to Wembley, The Kings are claiming their crown, Everybody will be singing, When the Spurs go marching home In our ranks there’s Ossie Ardiles, He’s had a dream for a year or two, That one day he’s gonna play at Wembley, Now his dream is coming true, Ossie we’re gonna be behind, you, Altogether man for man, We know you’re gonna play a blinder In de cup for Totting-ham Come on you Spurs are on their way to Wembley, Tottenham’s going to do it again, They can’t stop ’em, The boys from Tottenham, The boys from White Hart Lane, Spurs are on their way to Wembley, The Kings are claiming their crown, Everybody will be singing, When the Spurs go marching home Come on you Spurs are on their way to Wembley, Tottenham’s going to do it again, They can’t stop ’em, The boys from Tottenham, The boys from White Hart Lane, Spurs are on their way to Wembley, The Kings are claiming their crown, Everybody will be singing, When the Spurs go marching home Ossie’s going to Wembley, His knees have gone all trembley, Come on you Spurs, Come on you Spurs Ossie’s going to Wembley, His knees have gone all trembley, Come on you Spurs, Come on you Spurs Ossie’s going to Wembley, His knees have gone all trembley, Come on you Spurs, Come on you Spurs Er is iets verkeerd gegaan.

What do Spurs fans chant?

Glory glory, Tottenham Hotspur – Glory glory Tottenham Hotspur, Glory glory Tottenham Hotspur, Glory glory Tottenham Hotspur, And the Spurs go marching on. Tottenham are the greatest team the world has ever seen, Tottenham are the greatest team the world has ever seen, Tottenham are the greatest team the world has ever seen, And the Spurs go marching on.

  1. The pride of North of London we’re the kings of White Hart Lane, The pride of North of London we’re the kings of White Hart Lane, The pride of North of London we’re the kings of White Hart Lane, And the Spurs go marching on;

Loyal Spurs supporters and they come to every game, Loyal Spurs supporters and they come to every game, Loyal Spurs supporters and they come to every game, To watch the Spurs go marching on.

What is the slogan of Tottenham?

Tottenham Hotspur (Spurs) Football Club is located in North London. The club is also known as Spurs. Tottenham’s home ground is White Hart Lane. The club motto is Audere est Facere (To dare is to do). Our Club Shield is believed to date from 1956, in advance of the club’s 75th anniversary the following year.

Former player and manager Arthur Rowe, Tottenham born and bred, is said to have been involved in its design. It was made to depict the environment of Tottenham Hotspur Football Club. Bruce Castle, which is shown on the top left-hand side, is a 16th century building which currently houses the local history and archive collection of the London Borough of Haringey.

On the right are the seven trees planted at Page Green by the seven sisters of Tottenham, thus is the district known as Seven Sisters. The cockerel and ball first appeared in 1909 when a former player, one William James Scott, cast a copper centrepiece to perch on the new West Stand.

The two lions rampant are taken from the crest of the Northumberland family who feature heavily in the history of the local area. They lived at the Black House – later renamed Percy House – situated on the High Road opposite White Hart Lane.

It is probable that the Northumberland family hold the key to our being called Hotspur. Henry Percy, the 1st Earl of Northumberland, had a son Sir Henry Percy, whose deeds on the battlefields earned him the nickname ‘Harry Hotspur’. According to the history books he was slain at Shrewsbury in 1403.

The schoolboys who first created Hotspur Cricket Club in 1880, from which the football club came two years later, no doubt looked upon this character as their hero and named the club after him. In 1884, following two years of confusion between ourselves and another Hotspur FC based elsewhere in London, the name Tottenham Hotspur Football Club was adopted.

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Our motto, ‘Audere est Facere’ is a latin inscription, the literal translation meaning ‘to dare is to do’. In other words, unless you try you will never achieve. The badge depicting the two lions plus cockerel and ball was introduced in 1983 and updated in 1992.

The motif returned to the playing strip in 1999 after two years of the full crest appearing on the club kit. Having remained constant since its inception, the colours of the shield were amended in 1995 to ensure consistency with a darker blue background to match the badge.

The castle and ball switched from yellow to brown and the trees were given greater definition with the club initials now black on a white backdrop as opposed to light blue.

Why is Spurs emblem A cockerel?

tl;dr – Why is Tottenham called Spurs? Some young teenagers started a club near Tottenham High Road and named the team after Sir Harry Hotspur, a late-medieval English noble who owned lands that became the home of Tottenham. Hotspur was so nicknamed for his willingness to charge into battle, often while wearing spurs. Sources:

  • TottenhamHotspur. com
  • Historicalkits. co. uk
  • FootballHistory. org
  • SabotageTimes. com

What is the Y word?

Spurs Are On Their Way To Wembley Lyrics Some spurs fans chant the ‘Y-word’ (Picture: Getty) The ‘Y-word’ is a term considered an antisemitic slur against Jewish people. It has also been used by some supporters of Tottenham Hotspur FC for decades – albeit in a different context. Now, the club has told Spurs supporters it’s time to ‘move on’ from the use of the ‘Y-word’, having conducted a thorough consultation with as many as 23,000 fans.

One survey they conducted found that 94% of respondents acknowledged the term as racist – and only a minority said they would ever use it outside of the stadium setting. And in an overview of their findings , Spurs concluded: ‘As a club, we always strive to create a welcoming environment that embraces all our fans so that every one of our supporters can feel included in the match day experience.

‘It is clear the use of this term does not always make this possible, regardless of context and intention, and that there is a growing desire and acknowledgment from supporters that the ‘Y-word’ should be used less or stop being used altogether. ‘ But, in case you’re unaware, how did the word come to be used in the first place?.

What song do Tottenham play before kick off?

Glory Glory Tottenham Hotspur It is the last song that is played before the start of every match at White Hart Lane, with simple one-line verses such as the rather presumptuous ‘Tottenham are the greatest team the world has ever seen’ getting the home crowd going.

Why is Tottenham called N17?

Sub-districts [ edit ] – Because of Tottenham’s long history as a borough, the Tottenham name is used by some to this day to describe the whole of the area formerly covered by the old borough, incorporating the N17 postcode area and part of N15. However, there are differing views as to what constitutes the Tottenham neighbourhood in the present day.

  • North: This area stretches along Tottenham High Road from the Edmonton border in the north to Lordship Lane in the south: districts include Little Russia and Northumberland Park.
  • Central: Continuing along the high road, the central area includes Bruce Grove , Tottenham Green and Tottenham Hale wards, as well as Tottenham Hale station and retail park.
  • West: To the west of the area are Broadwater Farm and the Tower Gardens Estate.
  • South: Further along the A10 road until St Ann’s Road, including South Tottenham and Seven Sisters.

Why are they called Hotspurs?

Harry Hotspur, after whom the club is named, was said to have been given the nickname Hotspur as he dug in his spurs to make his horse go faster as he charged in battles, and spurs are also associated with fighting cocks.

What does it mean to dare is to do?

Definition of dare –  (Entry 1 of 3) auxiliary verb : to be sufficiently courageous to no one dared say a word she dare not let herself love — G. Shaw transitive verb 1 a : to challenge to perform an action especially as a proof of courage dared him to jump b : to confront boldly : defy dared the anger of his family 2 : to have the courage to contend against, venture, or try the actress dared a new interpretation of the classic role Definition of dare  (Entry 2 of 3) Definition of DARE  (Entry 3 of 3) Dictionary of American Regional English.

Why does Tottenham have a chicken?

Hotspur got his nickname because he wore spurs on his boots so his horse would run quicker. He was similarly a fan of fighting cocks, which he also equipped with spurs. These can be seen on the current badge of the club.

How much does it cost to be a Spurs mascot?

Premier League & Championship Clubs That Charge For Child Mascots

Club Cost Ages
Tottenham Hotspur £405 – £255 5-14
Wolverhampton Wanderers £395 – £290 4-11
Crystal Palace £375 (Gold) £100 (Silver) 5-14
Brighton and Hove Albion £350 (Captain) £250 (Standard) 7-12

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Has Tottenham ever won a trophy?

When is the last time Tottenham won a trophy? – Spurs have won silverware in the past, but it has been some time. The most recent trophy the club has won is the League Cup in 2008 (Carling Cup, later to be called Carabao Cup), beating Chelsea 2-1 in the final after extra time.

  • Goals from Dimitar Berbatov and Jonathan Woodgate saw Spurs through in that match, with the latter coming four minutes into the extra period;
  • Notable names in the Spurs lineup for that match included Jermaine Jenas and Robbie Keane, with Ledley King as captain and England international Paul Robinson in goal;
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They beat the likes of Petr Cech, Didier Drogba, and Frank Lampard who all started the game for Chelsea. In the run-up to the final, Spurs topped Middlesbrough, Blackpool, and Manchester City all by 2-0 scorelines. They then beat North London rivals Arsenal in the semifinals.

What is the Y word in England?

The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) has added a variant of the ‘Y-word’ as a new entry to describe supporters and players for Tottenham. Usage of the term to describe Jewish people can be considered offensive, but some Spurs fans have historically adopted the word in terrace chants.

  • The Oxford English Dictionary (OED), has also updated the ‘Y-word’ to include “a supporter of or player for Tottenham Hotspur Football Club”;
  • A Tottenham spokesman said: “As a club we have never accommodated the use of the ‘Y-word’ on any club channels or in club stores and have always been clear that our fans (both Jewish and gentile) have never used the term with any intent to cause offence;

“We find the Oxford English Dictionary’s definition of the word misleading given it fails to distinguish context and welcome their clarification. ” A spokeswoman for the OED said: “As a historical dictionary, the OED records the usage and development of words in the English language.

  • “We reflect, rather than dictate, how language is used which means we include words which may be considered sensitive and derogatory;
  • These are always labelled as such;
  • “The entry for ‘Y****’ is labelled as offensive and derogatory and our reference to Tottenham Hotspur is a reflection of the evidence for the word;

“As we state at the closely related word ‘Y**’, Tottenham Hotspur Football Club is traditionally associated with the Jewish community in north and east London, and the term is sometimes used as a self-designation by some Tottenham fans. “We will ensure the context for this connection is very clear in both definitions.

  • ” Some Tottenham supporters argue they have “reclaimed” the use of the word from rival fans, who they feel commonly used the term to insult supporters of the north London club, which has traditionally had a Jewish following;

Please use Chrome browser for a more accessible video player Ivor Baddiel, who produced the film ‘The Y-word’, was highly critical of the decision to include the terms in the dictionary. Comedian and writer David Baddiel, who made a 2010 film with his brother Ivor called ‘The Y-word’ for the Kick It Out campaign, has dismissed the link between the two communities as “mainly mythical” and said Spurs fans “have no right of reclamation”.

Baddiel told Sky News : “The vast majority of fans of the club, including those who self-designate as Y-words, are not Jewish and therefore have no right of ‘reclamation’. “What it will weirdly give succour to is the sense that Tottenham fans, rather than Jews, ‘own’ this race-hate word for Jews, a word that blackshirts painted on shops in the East End of London.

” Baddiel added: “I would ask the OED why, considering that they clearly think their definitions are exhaustive, they haven’t included the fact that the word is used not just as a benign ‘self-designation’ by Tottenham fans but also very often in a derogatory and racist way by non-Tottenham fans.

” Writer and filmmaker Ivor also rejected the idea that Spurs fans had any right to ‘reclaim’ the word and believes use of the term has simply led to others using it for derogatory purposes. “The vast majority of Spurs fans are not Jewish so they are reclaiming a word which is not technically theirs to reclaim,” he told Sky Sports News.

“The point of reclaiming a word, and with black people and the n-word, the point of doing it is to take the power away from the word and make people realise how terrible it is and stop them saying it which has by and large worked in the black community.

“If that is Tottenham fans’ aim it clearly hasn’t worked because it hasn’t made other fans stop saying it. In fact, what it has done is make other fans say it even louder back at them and do other horrendous chants as well.

I’m not saying that’s Tottenham fans’ fault but that is clearly what has happened so their reasons for reclaiming the word have not worked. ” Spurs Are On Their Way To Wembley Lyrics Image: David Baddiel is critical of the decision to include the terms in the dictionary He added: “If I was a Spurs fan, and there are many who don’t like the term and don’t refer to themselves by that term, and players as well – I don’t know any players who refer to it – I would be incredibly annoyed. “The way you could read it, it doesn’t say ‘some supporters or players’, in the dictionary it defines it as a ‘supporter or player for Tottenham’. Certainly, if I was one of the many who didn’t like the term and didn’t refer to myself as it I would be very annoyed.

“Secondly, usually, and I know the OED don’t just include words that are completely new and they say words that are new to them. Usually it is new words like ‘mansplaining’ which are new words to everyone but this is a term that, as far as I am aware, Spurs fans have been using since the ’50s, ’60s, certainly from the ’70s.

The OED have only got wind of it now, it seems very ridiculous. “The third thing to say is that if you are going to include these names that football fans call themselves, I presume in the next update you will have things like ‘gooner’ or ‘tractor boys’.

Are they going to be consistent and include all the other names?” Ivor is not sure if the OED’s decision legitimises the use of the word but is worried that it could normalise it. He said: “I don’t know about legitimising it.

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It basically normalises it – why now? It is inconsistent, is ‘gooner’ in there, to refer to an Arsenal fan? Why are they just having a nickname or a badge of honour or whatever you want to call it, for a Tottenham fan? Arsenal fans proudly call themselves ‘gooner’ and other fans have other names.

  • There is a lack of consistency which is worrying;
  • “I don’t think it legitimises it but it normalises it a bit which is worrying;
  • ” In recent years, efforts have been made to try to convince Tottenham fans to cease using the term, amid claims it is continuing to fuel antisemitism within football;

In 2013, the Football Association even warned fans that using the word could result in criminal charges. Jewish groups have branded the word “antisemitic”, whatever the context it is used in. Mr Simon Johnson, chief executive of the Jewish Leadership Council, told Sky News: “This is a term of abuse with malicious antisemitic overtones.

If the OED wishes to include such an expression it must make it abundantly clear that this is a despicable term of abuse. ” In December, Tottenham released the results of a poll on “the Y-word” that received more than 23,000 responses.

It revealed that 33 per cent of respondents use the Y-word “regularly” in a footballing context, while only 12 per cent would use it outside of this context. Some 94 per cent acknowledged the word can be considered a racist term against a Jewish person and nearly a half of respondents wanted supporters to abandon or use it less in chants.

  1. In a commentary on the word’s historic links, the club said “the Y-word was historically adopted by Spurs fans as a defence mechanism in order to ‘own’ the term and thereby deflect antisemitic abuse at that time in the 1970s”;

But it added that the poll responses indicated that few believed use of the word was effective in deflecting such abuse.

What does Spurs y stand for?

Used as a derogatory term for Jewish people, ‘Y**’ is commonplace at Tottenham games in chants by Spurs fans who use the term as a badge of honour.

What do Arsenal fans call Spurs fans?

What do Spurs Fans Call Arsenal? – Fans of Arsenal’s biggest and nearest rivals, Tottenham , have been known to call Arsenal ‘scum’, or ‘Woolwich’, in reference to the fact that they, unlike Spurs, do not have north London roots. ‘Gooners’ often reciprocate by calling Spurs ‘Spuds’ or ‘Sp*rs’.

The north London derby has been a world-famous mainstay of the English football calendar for years now, but of course given Arsenal’s history and south London roots, this has not always been the case, and Spurs fans like to remind the Gooners of this.

The story of why Arsenal relocated to the north of the capital is a strange one, as it was actually prompted by the burning down of part of their original stadium by suffragettes protesting against women not having the right to vote in Britain. It was after this happened in 1913 that the club moved north to the new Arsenal Stadium in Highbury, and an iconic local rivalry was born.

What are Spurs supporters called?

In Britain, the word ‘yid’ and its related term ‘yiddo’ are also used to refer to the supporters and players of Tottenham Hotspur, originally in a derogatory manner by rival fans, but now also used as self-designation in a non-pejorative sense by Tottenham fans, according to the Oxford English Dictionary.

Why do Spurs fans sing When the Saints?

The old hymn and jazz tune ” When the Saints Go Marching In ” is used by a number of teams in various sports. It may be used as the team’s theme song or reserved for when they scored. Liverpool fans used it as a football chant to honour their player Ian St John in the 1960s, a song that was also adopted by other clubs.

Southampton Football Club , for example, use it as a football chant due to the fact that their nickname is The Saints, other football clubs use different variations of the song. It may be used with the standard lyrics, specialized lyrics, or no lyrics at all.

When sung by a crowd, it is often started at a very slow tempo, around 70 beats per minute. The next verse is then dramatically sped up to somewhere around 140 beats per minute. The following is a partial list of its notable uses.

What a feeling What a night football chant?

LIVE ON talkSPORT – talkSPORT is your home of live football! Here’s what’s coming up on talkSPORT and talkSPORT 2.

  • Birmingham vs Sheffield United (Wednesday, 7:45pm) –  talkSPORT 2
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He tweeted the lyrics of the chant, sung to the tune of December, 1963 (Oh, What a Night) by The Four Seasons, which goes: “Oh what a night, watching Tottenham on a Tuesday night. You play Thursday ‘cos you’re f****** s****. What a feeling, what a night. ” You can can see the Spurs fans singing the chant below… Tottenham have plenty of experience playing on Thursday nights, but they can sit back and relax knowing their London rivals, rather than them, are in the Europa League this season.

What do we call Tottenham?

News sites –

  • Tottenham Hotspur F. on BBC Sport : Club news – Recent results and fixtures
  • Tottenham Hotspur Stats
  • British Pathe newsreels
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